GMAT Overview  |  Analytical Writing  |  Integrated Reasoning  |  Quantitative Section  |  Verbal Section  |  GMAT Tutorials

GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions — Features, Skills Tested and Directions

This page lists the key features of GMAT Data Sufficiency — one of two basic formats for GMAT Quantitative (math) questions. It also provides the test directions for this question format.

Key Features of GMAT Data Sufficiency

Here are some key facts about the Data Sufficiency question format:

How many: 13-14 questions

Where: In the 75-minute Quantitative section, mixed with Problem Solving questions

Format: Multiple-choice. A question is followed by two numbered statements, which provide specific information. You select one of five choices by clicking on an oval. The 5 answer choices are the same for every Data Sufficiency question.

Skills tested: Your ability to understand arithmetic, algebra, and geometry concepts, and your ability to reason logically about quantitative problems

Directions for Answering Data Sufficiency Questions

The following directions will appear on your screen just before your first Data Sufficiency question (and you can access them while tackling any Data Sufficiency question by clicking on the HELP button):

Directions: This problem consists of a question and two statements, labeled (1) and (2), in which certain data are given. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the question. Using the data given in the statements plus your knowledge of mathematics and everyday facts (such as the number of days in July or the meaning of counterclockwise), you must indicate whether:

  • statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked;

  • statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked;

  • BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient;

  • EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked;

  • statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data specific to the problem are needed.

Numbers: All numbers used are real numbers.
 
Figures: A figure accompanying a data sufficiency problem will conform to the information given in the question, but will not necessarily conform to the additional information in statements (1 and 2).
 
Lines shown as straight can be assumed to be straight and lines that appear jagged can also be assumed to be straight.
 
You may assume that positions of points, angles, regions, etc., exist in the order shown and that angle measures are greater than zero.
 
All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.
 
Note: If the data sufficiency problem asks you for the value of a quantity the data given in the statements are sufficient only when it is possible to determine exactly one numerical value for the quantity.
 
To review these directions for subsequent questions of this type, click on HELP.

Note that figures (visuals) accompanying Data Sufficiency questions are not necessarily drawn to scale (unless the question at hand indicates that a figure is drawn to scale).