Space is a fluid in motion(gravity--currents in space)


   Space is a fluid. Its motion guided by matter and the motion of
matter guided by the currents of this fluid. This would describe the
force of gravity very well. A particle with positive gravity would have a
spin rotating inward pulling in fluid and an a particle with negative
gravity would have a spin pushing out fluid or an outward spin.  The faster the
rate of motion or rotation(frequency) would determine the gravity and
therefore the mass of the particle. So all elementary particles of
matter would essentially be FLUID in MOTION around a CLOSED
CIRCULAR PATH. All forms of matter could also be seen essentially
as specific PATTERNS of MOTION in the great SEA of FLUID that
constitutes the PHYSICAL UNIVERSE.  This fluid is what may be
feeding energy into matter and this energy is then ejected outwards
AS other forces such as electromagnetism.  Also because gravity
increases when a given mass becomes more dense the inward
pulling force of the particles I have just described will become more
coherent or aligned as particles of matter come closer together
producing a stronger force.  The force of gravity (as modeled in this
view) being generated from currents of fluid in space could be
compared to currents in a stream or river. In a river or stream the
strength of the current is dependent on how fast the current is
moving. The faster  it is going the stronger the force. The same has
already been noted with gravity as when planets orbiting closer to
the sun do so faster than planets farther away from the sun AS
WELL the fact that objects in a gravitational field less than than that
of the earth(such as the moon) fall at a slower rate than that of
objects falling on earth.  This leads one to deduce that there is a
positive relationship between gravity and speed and therefore a
faster and stronger current is being produced by a more massive
object than by a less massive object.
 

            The following article was written by Charles Vind
 

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