Speakers

    Over the years, Seeburg offered a large variety of speakers to distribute jukebox sound all over an establishment. These speakers were of two types: high and low impedance. Some combined both versions, giving the choice of impedance at installation time. The high impedance types were more popularly known as 'C.V.' (for Constant Voltage), while the low impedance types are what most of us use for our home stereo systems. The low impedance are generally 8 Ohms, but 4 and 16 Ohm systems are also widely available. Most of the later (and all of the solid-state, except some early TSA2 and SHP1) amplifiers had output transformers. These transformers were primarily used as speaker power selecting devices for the console, Consolette, and low impedance external speakers. But they also served to step up the amplifier voltage to about 70 VAC (the so-called 'Constant Voltage') for distribution throughout the location. Stepping the voltage up reduces losses from the long lengths of cable used to connect the remote speakers. An added advantage of the output transformer in the stereo amplifiers is that by connecting the speaker to one terminal of each transformer, you can get monaural audio, rather than just a single stereo channel.

    At the speaker end of a C.V. installation, another transformer is used to step the voltage back down to a level the speaker itself can handle. Usually, the C.V. speaker included a set of jumpers or a selector switch to select the power level delivered to each speaker. Below are illustrations of most of the speakers offered, starting in the late 40s/early 50s. Each has a short explanation including its model number, speaker sizes, and whether or not it used the C.V. transformer. All speakers are permanent-magnet types.

RS1-8, RS2-8, CVWS2-8, CVS4-8.

All used similar cabinets. RS-1, CVWS2-8, and CVS4-8 used a terminal strip to select 500 Ohm (C.V.) or 8 Ohm impedance, while the RS-2 used a volume control 'key', similar to that used to control jukebox volume for the machines built during that time. The key was a flat piece of metal with a slot cut into it.

The transformer has several power setting taps available via the switch for the RS-2. For the RS-1, the transformer secondary tap selection is made by moving a jumper connected to the terminal strip.

 

 

RS1-12, RS2-12, CVWS2-12.

These are similar to those above, except that they used a 12-inch speaker.

 

CVS6-8, CVS7-12, HFAS2-12, HFCV1-12.

All are 12-inch speakers, except CVS6-8, an 8-inch. The CVS- speakers have C.V. transformers, as does HFCV1-12. HFAS2-12 is a 16 Ohm impedance speaker.

 

 

RS4-8, RS5-8, RS4-12, RS5-12

RS4-8, RS5-8 (both 8-inch), RS4-12, RS5-12 (both 12-inch). These were C.V. only.

At left is a scan of the manual sheet for this speaker.

If anyone has a photo of any of these, please email me with it, and I'll post it here, giving credit.

TR1-8C1, TR1-8C2, TR1-8

A round, perforated with much smaller holes grille was used for TR1-8C1 (Channel 1), TR1-8C2 (Channel 2, and TR1-8 (no Channel marking). All were C.V. types.

At left is a scan of the manual sheet for this speaker.

If anyone has a photo of any of these, please email me with it, and I'll post it here, giving credit.

 

EBCW1-12, EBCW2-12

These are also C.V., 12-inch speakers, featuring 'Extended Bass'. They were designed either to hang on a wall or mount in a corner, near the ceiling. They differ in trim (using different variations on the Seeburg logo).

HFCV2-8

This is also C.V., but an 8-inch speaker. They were designed to hang on a wall only.

HFAS3-8, HFCV1-8, HFCV3-8, EBTC1-12C1, EBTC1-12C2

The -8 speakers were 8-inch; the -12 were 12-inch. HFAS3-8 has a 16 Ohm speaker, all others were C.V. All were designed to mount in a room corner, either near the floor or at the ceiling. HFCV1-8 and HFCV3-8 differed in trim (logo and color). EBCT1-12C1 (left in the photo) was labeled 'Channel 1' while EBCT1-12C2 (right) was labeled 'Channel 2'.

TC1-8, TW1-8, TC1-8C1, TC1-8C2, TW1-8C1, TW1-8C2

All are 8-inch, C.V. speakers. The TCx version contains hardware for mounting in a corner, while the rest are designed to mount on a wall. The cabinets are identical. The -8C1 has a 'Channel 1' logo, while the -8C2 has a 'Channel 2' logo.  Suggested retail price (TW1-8September, 1974) USD $70.00. per pair.

There was also a 'pendent' assembly (4PA-1) which permitted four of these speakers to be hung from a ceiling mount. Intended for use in large halls.

UCS1 Universal Column Speakers

The Seeburg logo can be rotated so that the speaker can be mounted either horizontally or vertically. These, too are C.V. speakers and contain a pair of 8-inch speakers. One is a low-frequency woofer; the other is a high-frequency tweeter.  Suggested retail price (September, 1974) USD $153.00 per pair.

FR16

Power capacity: 16 Watts. Contains an 8-inch woofer, 3 1/2-inch tweeter, and crossover network. This speaker can either be used as C.V., or low impedance (low Z) as determined by which rear terminals are connected to the amplifier. These have the modern 'book-shelf' look.

FR50

Power capacity: 50 Watts. Higher-power version, containing a 12-inch woofer, horn tweeter, and crossover. These are low impedance-only speakers.  Suggested retail price (September, 1974) USD $195.00 per pair.

FRCS

Full-range column speakers. Contains two 10-inch woofers and two 3-inch by 9-inch horns. These are low impedance-only speakers, and are quite tall (46 inches in height).

Photo Needed!  DWS-1 Discotheque Wall Speaker

Similar to the DWS-2 below, except that the sectoral horn is deleted; probably replaced with an internal tweeter. These are low impedance-only speakers.

If you have a photo of one, please email me with it, and I'll post it here, giving credit.

DWS-2 Discotheque Wall Speaker

Contains a 12-inch woofer, 'sectoral' horn, and crossover network. The horns and drivers were provided by Altec-Lansing and sound phenomenal. The woofers were made by Utah. These are quite heavy (72 lbs), so if you mount them on a wall, make sure it can withstand the weight! These are low impedance-only speakers.

These and the DDS1, DDS2 following were built at the same time as the LPC480, APFEAU1, and PFEAU1 jukeboxes were in production. Seeburg was pushing the Discotheque craze at the time, offering complete packages down to the dance floor, napkins, etc.

DDS1 Speaker System

These used two Utah 15-inch woofers, and a sectoral horn and driver, provided by Altec-Lansing. If you thought the DWS-2 sounds good, you ain't heard nothin' yet! Speaking of weight, each one weighs 172 lbs! These are low impedance-only speakers.

 

DDS2 Speaker System

The DDS2 is similar to the DDS1, replacing the sectoral horn with a mid-range and high-frequency diffraction horn. These are low impedance-only speakers. Photo by ebay.

MFS1 Modular Full-range Speaker

Seeburg also built the MFS1 Modular Full-range Speaker, MWS1 Modular Woofer Speaker, and MHS1 Modular Horn Speaker. All were intended for use with the AMS Automatic Music System. The MWS1 and MFS1 shared the same cabinet, somewhat smaller and deeper than the DDS1 pictured above. I used to have a set of MFS1s, but sold them and never got a picture of them. These are low impedance-only speakers.

 

Photo courtesy Matt Rauber, who has a fine looking pair of MFS1s!

MWS1 Modular Woofer Speaker.

These are low impedance-only speakers.

Anyone having pictures please email me with them, and I'll post them here, giving credit.

MHS1 Modular Horn Speaker

These are low impedance-only speakers.

Anyone having pictures please email me with them, and I'll post them here, giving credit.

LS50 Lighted Speaker

Power capacity: 50 Watts. Low impedance only, using a pair of 8-inch woofers, horn tweeter and crossover network. The light was powered by a separate Light Power Supply (LPS2-56, 120 VAC 50/60 Hz line, or LPS2-H5, 235 VAC 50 Hz Mains) housed within the jukebox.  Suggested retail price (September, 1974) USD $200.00 per pair.

Note that later brochure photos show these without the 'SSSS' on each side lit.

QS50 Lighted Speaker

Power capacity: 50 Watts. Low impedance only, using a 12-inch woofer and horn tweeter. The QS-50 was introduced as part of the Seeburg Quadraphonic package. Like the LS50, the light was also powered by the LPS2-56/H5 Light Power Supply.

50K-FC

Power capacity: 50 Watts. This was the optional speaker offered with the FC2 jukebox, using a 12-inch woofer and horn tweeter. I believe it to be identical to the FR50 above, except that the Seeburg logo has been deleted. These are low impedance-only speakers.

 

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