Console Era Jukeboxes

     Seeburg started what came to be called the 'Console Era' in 1962, when the LPC1 Console began production. The other manufacturers soon followed suit with their versions. In my opinion, this era lasted until 1968, ending with the LS2 Gem. I suppose it could be argued that all machines built after 1961 could be considered as 'Console Era', since all machines followed this styling concept. Please note that the year listed below is the year in which the machine was first produced.  It would be considered as the following year's model. The prices listed below came from a Seeburg Phonograph Reference sheet, which was basically a price list listing various features of each machine.

LPC1 Console 160 selections, 33⅓ RPM native, 45 RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

LPC1R same as above except equipped for remote selections.

Introduced August, 1962.    Price $1933 (LPC1), $1995 (LPC1R).    Universal Pricing became standard starting with this machine.

Seeburg introduced the 'Console Era' with this machine, and the competition soon followed with their versions. No longer is the mechanism visible, and won't be in a Seeburg machine until the SMC1 of 1978 (and then only the turntable is visible). This machine normally played at 33 1/3 RPM (to stimulate the sales of Seeburg's own 'Little LPs'), and used an Auto-Speed to change the frequency of the motor power when a 45 RPM record was played. The record speed was determined by sensing the size of the record center hole. In this and the following LPC480 model, if both sides of an album were selected, the 'A' side played first, followed immediately by the 'B' side. Originally, this machine was shipped with the same 'ear' speakers (but with different graphics) as were standard with the previous DS100, DS160 machines. Shortly after introduction, these speakers became optional. The LPC1 sounds significantly better with a pair of DS speakers attached.

There was also a hideaway (HLPC1) version of this machine. Its price was $1598.

Books applicable to this machine: Console-Era Comboination offer, Console-Era Jukeboxes, Mech book

LPC1B 160 selections, 33⅓ RPM native, 45 RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

LPC1BR same as above except equipped for remote selections.

Introduced October, 1963.    Price $1933 (LPC1B), $1995 (LPC1BR).

It's identical to the LPC1 (above), except that the cabinet is finished in a blonde color scheme. Thanks to Kevin Green for providing this photo.

Books applicable to this machine: Console-Era Comboination offer, Console-Era Jukeboxes, Mech book

LPC480BL 480 Console in blue grille cloth. 160 selections, 33⅓ RPM native, 45 RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

LPC480BLR same as above except equipped for remote selections.

Introduced May, 1964.

One of my favorite machines (so much so, I put another photo below). This machine was in production when I first started working at Seeburg, fresh out of high school. Probably the most complex machine ever built by Seeburg (except for the AMS1 home unit, on the Home/Commercial Units page). Very similar to the LPC1, except for the new upper speaker grilles and an album facsimile display panel above them. This latter was a 'play stimulator' to increase customer play. When a selection is made, the facsimiles light up in seemingly random order for about 15 seconds, and then stop on a specific album picture. The customer can then play that album  for a reduced price, as long as the select button is pressed while the display is lit. This was controlled by an 'Album Scan Control', a special chassis inside the box. It proved very unpopular, and I doubt you'll find one nowadays with it intact; it was illegal in some states. Most machines just have this entire area blanked off. There was also a discotheque version (LPC480D/DBL) of this machine available, even MORE complicated than the original. Like the LPC1, this machine also played normally at 33 1/3 RPM, and used the AutoSpeed whenever a 45 RPM record was played.

Books applicable to this machine: Console-Era Comboination offer, Console-Era Jukeboxes, Mech book

LPC480T 480 Console, in orange (called 'burnt tangerine' by Seeburg). 160 selections, 33⅓ RPM native, 45 RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

LPC480TR same as above except equipped for remote selections.

Introduced May, 1964.

Also available as a discotheque model (LPC480DT). Both Discotheque versions had an added switch in the rear, which when in the Disco position, would only play those records in the pre-defined Disco groups. For the non-Disco (i.e., normal) machines, these same groups defined the album groups and controlled how the now-playing indicator worked (if an album, only the 'A' side indicator lit, otherwise, the current play side indicator lit). The Disco version also had another amplifier, the TSA3 installed rather than the TSA1. The only difference between amplifiers is a couple of miscellaneous connectors. Part of the Disco kit was a selection of external speaker systems, which were quite well designed and built, featuring Altec-Lansing horns and Utah Woofers.

Books applicable to this machine: Console-Era Combination offer, Console-Era Jukeboxes, Mech book

U100 Mustang 100 selections, 45 RPM native, 33⅓ RPM with optional Auto-Speed engaged.

Introduced January, 1965.    Price: $1095.

One of my least-favorite Seeburg jukeboxes (my apologies to those who own or admire them). This machine was the industry's first all Solid State machine.

Books applicable to this machine: 100 selection combination offer, 100-Selection book, Mech book

U100D Discotheque, Jr. 100 selections, 45 RPM native, 33⅓ RPM with optional Auto-Speed engaged.

Introduced ? 1965.

The disco version has sometimes been confused with the later SMC1 Jr., probably because of the name similarities. The SMC1 was called Disco. An Auto-Speed (33TASU4) was optional for this machine, and the U100 above. Photo courtesy of Hildegard Stamann, of Stamann Musicboxen.

Books applicable to this machine: 100 selection combination offer, 100-Selection book, Mech book

 

APFEA1 Fleetwood 160 selections, 33⅓ RPM native, 45 RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

PFEA1U Electra 160 selections, 33⅓ RPM native, 45 RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

Introduced September, 1965.    Price: $1398 (PFEA1U), $1535 (APFEA1).

Both machines are externally identical, with the same basic cabinet design as the LPC series. Here, Seeburg took the Discotheque fad to its final extreme. These machines played normally at 33 1/3 RPM, using the Auto-Speed for 45s. The APFEA1 played albums in the same manner as the LPC series - if both sides were selected, the 'A' side played first, followed by the 'B' side. For the PFEA1U, album sides were played in the same manner as singles - as the carriage got to them.

Books applicable to this machine: Console-Era Combination offer, Console-Era Jukeboxes, Mech book

SS160 Stereo Showcase. 160 selections, 33⅓ RPM native, 45 RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

Introduced September, 1966.

Last machine to play natively at 33 1/3 RPM. All later machines (prior to the SMC1) were either 45 RPM only, or used an optional Auto-Speed to reduce the motor speed for a 33 1/3 RPM record. The 1978 model SMC1 finally deleted the Auto-Speed option altogether, playing 45s only.

The upper panel rotated every few seconds, showing one of three scenes including album covers to stimulate play and to attract customers to the machine.

Books applicable to this machine: Console-Era Combination offer, Console-Era Jukeboxes, Mech book

LS1 Spectra 160 Selections, 45 RPM native, 33⅓ RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

Introduced September, 1967.

This machine started another new cabinet style, which lasted for three model years. Here, the album cover also rotated every few seconds (in the photo, the album cover is the picture of the blonde girl just above the selector -who, according to Brenda Fleming, is Samantha Fox).

The LS1 and LS2 below offered a 'Two Quarter Bonus Kit' and a 'Dollar Pre-Select Kit'.  I am looking for information on both. If your machine has either, or if you have any information beyond what is in the Service Manual for this machine, please contact me.

Books applicable to this machine: Console-Era Combination offer, Console-Era Jukeboxes, Mech book

S100 Phono Jet 100 selections, 45 RPM.

Introduced 1967.

First of a new, smaller cabinet for the 100 selection machine. Note the resemblance to the SS160. Thanks to Dennis & Sue Lavin for providing this photo of their S100.

Books applicable to this machine: 100 selection combination offer, 100-Selection book, Mech book

LS2 Gem 160 selections, 45 RPM native, 33⅓ RPM with Auto-Speed engaged.

Introduced 1968.

With this model, Seeburg had finally had enough of the rotating album cover display.

The LS2 and LS1 above offered a 'Two Quarter Bonus Kit' and a 'Dollar Pre-Select Kit'.  I am looking for information on both. If your machine has either, or if you have any information beyond what is in the Service Manual for this machine, please contact me. If you look closely at the illustration, you will notice that this machine has the Dollar Pre-Select Kit installed.  The select buttons are the white rectangles below the coin entry, just to the right and above the selector keys.

Books applicable to this machine: Console-Era Combination offer, Console-Era Jukeboxes, Mech book

SE100 Golden Jet 100 selections, 45 RPM.

Introduced 1970.   Price: $1150.

Warmover of the earlier S100 styling, with an additional speaker panel above the selector. Very appealing to apartment dwellers since it takes so little space.  The SE100S is shown, with the optional speaker panel above the selector buttons. The base unit (model SE100) did not include the upper speaker cabinet.

Books applicable to this machine: 100 selection combination offer, 100-Selection book, Mech book

SX100 Marauder 100 Selections, 45 RPM.

Introduced 1972.    Price: $1095.

Probably the smallest juke ever built by Seeburg. Sort of reminds me of a Remington Electric shaver.

Books applicable to this machine: 100 selection combination offer, 100-Selection book, Mech book

SL100 Carnival 100 Selections, 45 RPM.

Introduced 1973.

Warmover of the previous year's SX100, but much more colorful.

Books applicable to this machine: 100 selection combination offer, 100-Selection book, Mech book

SB100 Magnastar 100 selections, 45 RPM.

Introduced 1975.

First machine of a new, attractive cabinet style, with graphics primarily in green and blue. When I asked our industrial designer why so much green, his response was "People in the Orient are very attracted to green". This is the last machine to use the electro-mechanical pricing and selection system that had been in production for a decade. This model also introduced the SHP2 amplifier, a lower-powered version of the SHP1/3.

Books applicable to this machine: 100 selection combination offer, 100-Selection book, Mech book

Even though the remaining jukeboxes could be considered as members of the 'Console Era', I have decided to end it here. The next group of jukeboxes are from Seeburg's 'Digital Era', which started in 1969 and ended in 1978. The 'Digital Era' consists of machines using the digital 'Black & Gray Boxes', or the 'Red Box'. Chronologically, many of the machines pictured above overlap portions of that era. Click here to see the digital machines.

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